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TRAVELSMART EMPLOYERS KIT, 2003

Case Studies

There's nothing like hearing it from the horse's mouth and to prove that the concepts behind TravelSmart can apply to real situations, this pack includes some case studies from around the world of employers who've developed and implemented access plans.

The employers included cover a broad range of types of work and location, and demonstrate that real gains can be made for both the organisation and its staff.

As more case studies are developed, they will be made available on this website.

Current case studies:

BASF Ludwigshafen, Germany

The Situation

One of the world's biggest chemical companies, BASF has around 53 000 staff at its headquarters in Ludwigshafen, near Mannheim.

The company developed an access plan in response to increasing car traffic to its worksite and a rise in the number of car accidents on the site.

The Solution

BASF set up a working group to develop an access plan for the site which featured the following initiatives.

The Results

The BASF access plan has:

BELLCORE Piscataway, New Jersey, USA

The Situation

Bellcore is a telecommunications research and development company with over 5000 employees in a suburban location.

It has limited access to public transport so most staff drive to work alone.

The Solution

Because potential Bellcore carpoolers expressed fear of being stranded without a car in the event of unexpected overtime or emergencies, a guaranteed ride home program was established.

For those who cycle or walk to work, showers, cycle racks and lockers are provided.

Vanpooling, assistance in matching carpoolers and compressed work schedules were also offered.

The use of internal videoconferencing has also been increased to help reduce employee trips between worksites.

The Results

Bellcore's program has:

BOOTS Nottingham, UK

The Situation

Boots is one of the UK's largest chemist chains with its headquarters in Beeston on the outskirts of Nottingham.

It has some 7500 staff and developed an access plan as part of its move from an inner-city location to a business park site.

The Solution

Boots joined the Nottingham version of TravelSmart and launched its own access plan with a "travel-to-work" fair at the company headquarters. Local bus companies, cycling organisations and environmental groups were invited to set up stands and talk to staff.

Boots aims to reduce the number of cars coming to the worksite by 20% by 2005. The company's plan included the establishment of a carpooling scheme with software on the intranet. Staff signing up to the scheme were entered in a prize draw to win bicycles for their family.

The scheme was advertised through newsletters, posters and leaflets. Staff were assured of a guaranteed ride home if their car sharing arrangements fell through at short notice.

The company offered a guaranteed ride home for carpoolers who were stranded as well as priority parking spaces near the building entrance. This parking is higher priority than that given to directors and managers.

Extra purpose-built bicycle sheds have been developed where staff can park their bike safely and have a shower, get changed and use a locker.

The Results

The Boots access plan has:

FORD Genk, Belgium

The Situation

Ford has a car manufacturing plant with over 12 000 employees in Genk. The company wanted to reduce the environmental impact of staff car traffic and increase the use of the company bus.

It faced a localised problem, especially at shift changeover when 3000 employees arrived and departed from the site at the same time. This resulted in some accidents involving cyclists and car drivers.

The Solution

The access plan focused on improving the company bus system with more direct and faster routes, better location of bus stops and allowing employees from neighbouring companies to use Ford's company buses.

Carpooling was promoted through an active campaign run by an appointed co-ordinator. Both carpoolers and bus users were guaranteed a ride home if they had to work overtime.

To reduce the number of on-site accidents, a new subway was built outside the factory to allow cyclists to cross the road and avoid any conflict with motor vehicles.

The Results

As a result of the implementation of the access plan, the company achieved the following split of travel modes used to get to work:

EDUCATIONAL TESTING SERVICE Princeton, New Jersey, USA

The Situation

The Educational Testing Service (ETS) has its headquarters in a suburban office park. The 2395 staff has little access to public transport, must travel frequently between worksites and have varying work schedules.

ETS developed its access plan after seeking feedback from employees through surveys and focus groups. Throughout the process, strong management support played a crucial role in the plan's acceptance.

The Solution

The plan developed a commuter club whose members had to catch public transport, cycle or walk to work at least 3 days a week.

In return, members received benefits such as preferential parking, a guaranteed ride home in emergencies, and access to a car for travel between sites. Staff who vanpooled or caught public transport also received financial incentives in the form of subsidies of up to $105 a month.

In addition, ETS employees could choose to work compressed work schedules (longer hours per day, fewer days per week) or telecommute.

The company was also able to negotiate with the local public transport operator to provide a new bus line for the site.

The Results

The ETS access plan has:

CH2M HILL Bellevue, Washington, USA

The Situation

CH2M Hill is an engineering firm which has recently moved into new offices in the Seattle suburb of Bellevue.

The firm has 430 employees and faced a potential problem of having too few parking spaces for the number of drivers.

The Solution

Taking advantage of the move, which automatically caused staff to re-think their journey to work, the firm offered employees $70 per month if they walked, cycled, caught public transport or carpooled to get to work.

Those wanting to drive alone were offered free parking.

The Results

The number of staff driving to work alone dropped by 39 per cent after the move.

At the same time, the numbers of staff walking and cycling to work jumped dramatically, as shown in the table below:

  before move after move
drive alone 89 % 54 %
carpool 9 % 12 %

public transport

1 % 17 %
walking / cycling 1 % 17 %

NESTLE Noisel, France

The Situation

Nestle is one of the world's largest food manufacturers. It developed an access plan for its 1600 employees as part of a re-location to a new site less accessible by other means.

The Solution

The access plan had a strong emphasis on carpooling and included the following actions.

The Results

As a result of the implementation of the access plan, Nestle registered 550 staff for matching for the carpool program with 125 becoming regular carpoolers.

LANDESKRANKENHAUS Tulln, Austria

The Situation

The Tulln city hospital (or "krankenhaus") is based in a region with one of the lowest population densities and highest car ownership rates in Austria. The hospital takes its staff from 80 neighbouring communities in addition to the city of Tulln and operates 24 hours a day, posing a significant challenge for those seeking to increase public transport usage.

The Solution

Because of this rather difficult situation, the hospital focused on those trips where practical alternatives existed-walking and cycling for staff living nearby. The hospital also worked to reduce the use of cars for shopping trips and running errands during the day. It also tried to reduce the use of light goods vehicles for goods delivery to the hospital. One of the key features of the access plan was a voluntary approach to reducing car traffic. The plan has avoided the use of restrictive measures such as parking prohibitions and choosing, instead, to focus on positive motivation and awareness raising.

The Results

The result of the first phase promoting walking and cycling to local staff has been successful with the share of staff using non-motorised means up by 38%. At the same time the share of staff driving to work alone has dropped from 60% to 57%. The number of shopping trips during the working day by car has been reduced by 23% and the number of delivery trips by light goods vehicles to the hospital is down by 60%.

RIJNSTATE HOSPITAL Arnhem, Netherlands

The Situation

A shortage of parking spaces for the 2700 staff encouraged the hospital board to develop an access plan to promote alternatives to the private car. The plan placed particular emphasis on carpooling, cycling and public transport.

The Solution

The access plan included the following initiatives.

The Results

As a result of the Rijnstate Hospital access plan, in the following 2 years:

WOLFORDS Bregenz, Austria

The Situation

Wolfords is a textile and clothing manufacturer with 1300 employees in its Bregenz office. It developed an access plan to create a better environmental record and improve its public image.

The Solution

The access plan included the following actions.

The Results

The Wolfords access plan has:

WATERSCHAP VELUWE Appeldorn, Netherlands

The Situation

Waterschap Veluwe is a water treatment company in the eastern part of the Netherlands with around 200 employees.

The relocation to an industrial site in Appeldorn in 2000 gave the company a chance to change the travel habits of some its staff members through the development and implementation of an access plan.

The Solution

The plan concentrated on cycling, public transport and carpooling. Waterschap Veluwe gave a free bicycle to all staff living within 10 kilometres of the new office as well as an allowance to help them get home by other means on bad weather days. High quality cycle sheds, showers and change rooms were installed in the new building.

The company negotiated lower fares for employees as part of a regional transport agreement with bus operators. Staff were also able to buy annual tickets through an interest free loan and pay the money back through monthly salary deductions.

The company set up carpooling software on the intranet to help potential carpoolers find a ride and also gave an allowance to carpoolers to cover any extra costs they might incur. A guaranteed ride home in the case of emergencies was also offered.

The Results

The Waterschap Veluwe access plan has: