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TRAVELSMART TEACHER RESOURCE KIT, 2003

Section 2 - Tuning in

2.1 A changing world
2.2 Four wheels and a motor
2.3 Keeping a travel diary
2.4 How we come to school
2.5 Parking it
2.6 The spread of cities (MP and UP only)

2.1 A changing world

Objectives

To establish an appreciation of what life was like before the development of the motor car; to realise how the motor car has changed over time and to understand that the motor car has changed our society.

Outcomes

Students will be able to:

Activities JUNIOR PRIMARY - 2.1 Learning activities

Discussion

Ask students to think about the types of transport that would have been used before 'everybody' had a motor car. Make a list of transport types, for example, horse and cart, walking, cycling, public transport, scooter, roller skates.

How would this have affected the way people lived?

Concept map

Develop a concept map to explore travel concepts - how far would people have travelled, how fast would they have travelled, where would they have shopped, how would they have travelled to work, where did they go in their spare time, how were loads carried?

Links Section 5 - Resources - 5.1 Thinking and teaching strategies

Research

Ask students to use resources from home and school to find out what early forms of transport looked like. Research motor cars, bicycles, motor bikes, buses, trams, trains and carts, even wheelbarrows. What form of transport would they want to have travelled in? Create a class collage of ideas and reasons for choices.

Descriptive writing

Students find a picture of their favourite car in a magazine or newspaper and write a description of it. They could also tell a story of a journey they have been on with their family or friends.

Links Section 5 - Resources - 5.3 Text types

Design - What will cars be like in the future?

Ask students to design a futuristic car, incorporating favourite features. As a class, develop an assessment plan for car design. Each group member explains their design to the group and is assessed on their presentation. Create a role play of the launch of the vehicle to the world.

Activities MIDDLE PRIMARY - 2.1 Learning activities

TravelSmart Log

What is a log? (a record of events; a systematic record of things done1). All TravelSmart activities could be kept in a personal log book or folder. Start with a glossary page which lists all the words associated with TravelSmart that students should understand.

For example, what does 'motor vehicle' mean? Brainstorm different types of motor vehicles. Build a glossary of these transport terms and add to it throughout the TravelSmart unit of work.

Research

Students write a letter to a grandparent or older friend, asking them about the modes of transport they experienced or used when they were younger.

Focus questions:

Links Section 5 - Resources - 5.3 Text types

Interview

Students prepare a list of questions about travel experiences to ask an older person - a friend, neighbour, grandparent or great grand parent. Local retirement villages may be willing to participate in this activity.

Students could record their interviews using either a video camera or cassette recorder, or by noting answers. It is necessary to gain prior permission from interviewees if the information they give is recorded or used in any way.

Additional focus questions:

Links Section 5 - Resources - 5.1 Thinking and teaching strategies

WWW Copyright information

Recount

Links Section 5 - Resources - 5.3 Text types

Pencil Activity 2.1 MP - Development of the motor car and bicycle

Create a collage timeline of the development of the motor car, using different materials to 'build' the vehicles. Display the completed work in the school foyer or at a local business. Photocopy the activity for each student.

Links Section 5 - Resources - 5.2 The Development of the motor car and bicycle

1 The Australian Concise Oxford Dictionary. 3rd ed. 1997. OUP. South Melbourne, Vic.


Activities UPPER PRIMARY - 2.1 Learning activities

Mind map

Create a mind map to explore the implications of the development of the motor car on aspects of our lifestyle - business and economy, social, health, leisure, holidays, sport, entertainment.

Links Section 5 - Resources - 5.1 Thinking and teaching strategies



Timeline

WWW AGO website

Links Section 5 - Resources - 5.2 The Development of the motor car and bicycle

WWW History of cars:

ICT ICT idea - Search using the Images option

www.google.com

Debate/exposition

'That all of the developments in car technology are good.'

Links Section 5 - Resources - 5.1 Thinking and teaching strategies

Research

The development of the motor car has brought with it thousands of occupations - jobs that did not in exist before the invention of the car. Brainstorm motor industry jobs and, individually, choose one occupation to research. Students find out what the job entails, what materials are used, who are the industry leaders in their chosen field. If they know someone who works in the motor industry, students could ask them some questions to build their knowledge base on the subject, or invite them to speak to the class.

Mind map

Since the mass production of the Model T Ford, the modifications to motor car design have been endless. From research on the history of the motor car, brainstorm a list of types of modifications, then in groups develop a detailed mind map about one of them, for example, indicator lights, horn, seatbelts, fuel.

Links Section 5 - Resources - 5.1 Thinking and teaching strategies

Find-a-Word

Students create a Find-a-Word or crossword using key words from the timeline.

Research - Car rally

Care, preservation and restoration of veteran, vintage and classic cars is a popular hobby.

Access information about a car rally in your state:

WWW For example:


2.2 Four wheels and a motor

Objectives

To consider the impact of the motor vehicle on our lives and to establish that the motor vehicle is a major mode of transport in our society.

Outcomes

Students will be able to:

Activities JUNIOR PRIMARY - 2.2 Learning activities

Design

Ask students to find a picture, take a photo or draw their favourite car. Label all its features, for example, bonnet, front, rear, boot, aerial, headlights.

ICT ICT idea

Use a digital camera, import it to a word processing document, add lines, labels.

Discussion

What does the motor car mean to our society?

Focus questions:

Concept map

Build a concept map in categories of work, shopping, weekends, holidays, school - develop the ideas of when the car is needed and when it is not.

Links Section 5- Resources - 5.1 Thinking and teaching strategies

Design a poster

Ask students to design a poster that shows their family using the motor car for at least four different purposes, things that they could not do if they didn't have a car. Share and compare with other members of the class.

P.M.I. - Plus. Minus. Interesting

Develop a Plus. Minus. Interesting chart with the class, based on themes such as

Links Section 5 - Resources - 5.1 Thinking and teaching strategies

Activities MIDDLE PRIMARY - 2.2 Learning activities

Discussion

Cars come in all shapes and sizes and accommodate all kinds of passenger groups. Brainstorm a list of different types of motor vehicles, for example, ute, sedan, 'people mover', four wheel drive. Choose one type from the list and develop a mind map about its features - what makes it different to other types of motor vehicles, what is its target market, why?

Pencil Activity 2.2 MP - Four wheels and a motor

After class discussion ask students to work with a partner to record their thoughts about the motor car. List the ways in which their family uses the motor car and compare their list with that of their partner. Students could rank the uses of the car based on importance and consider how they would do the same activities without a car.

P.M.I. - Plus. Minus. Interesting

The car has broken down and cannot be repaired until next week. Your family has several events to attend during the time you will be without the car, as well as having to go to work and school each day. What will you do?

Links Section 5 - Resources - 5.3 Text types

Collage

Create a collage from advertisements for cars and car accessories. The 'Motoring' section of newspapers and advertising junk mail are good sources of pictures. Encourage students to develop a theme for their work and use it as a cover for their TravelSmart Log (see Section 2 - 2.1 A changing world - Middle Primary).

Activities UPPER PRIMARY - 2.2 Learning activities

Research

Research recent inventions in the development of the motor car. A hybrid vehicle that has an electric/petrol engine and is economical to drive, has been developed.

Focus questions:

Using keywords, locate a web site that provides information about hybrid vehicles.

Electric cars

Refer to Section 5 Resources 5.2 The Development of the Motor Car and Bicycle, and make a timeline of the development of electric cars. Access websites to research more developments in electric car technology and add the information to your timeline.

ICT ICT idea

- Plan a lesson which teaches students about keyword searching to extend their skills in successful use of the Internet.

WWW CARisma

Links Section 5 - Resources - 5.2 The Development of the motor car and bicycle

Design

Students brainstorm all the features of a car and, using a drawing software program, create a car with all the features that they think are important on a motor vehicle. They could make models from their designs and present them to the class as a car salesperson would, outlining special features to entice potential buyers.

ICT ICT idea

Film students presentations on video as advertisements

Investigation

Divide the class into car make groups. Each group has several tasks:

Links Section 5 - Resources - 5.3 Text types

WWW CARisma

Pencil Activity 2.2 MP


2.3 Keeping a travel diary

Objectives

To consider the current impacts of the motor vehicle and to make predictions regarding future consequences if car usage continues to increase; to learn about current personal travel trends by keeping a travel diary.

To learn, through investigation, how much we depend on the motor car for transport.

Outcomes

Students will be able to:

Activities JUNIOR PRIMARY - 2.3 Learning activities

Class discussion

Ask students to consider why we keep diaries. For example, some types of diaries are for homework, birthdays, anniversaries, special events, appointments.

Pencil Activity 2.3 JP - Travel diary

Introduce the concept of a travel diary to record the ways that students travel every day. Students could either complete it at school each morning for a week or take it home for completion with their families. Travel means all movement outside the home. Students will need to fill in a separate line for each part of the same trip.

Discussion

From findings of the sample travel diary pages, discuss why the car is the most used form of travel.

Pencil Activity 2.3 JP - Our travel habits

From their travel diaries, students collate the information about how often they have used various modes of transport during the last week. For most students, the number of car trips will be significantly higher than the other modes. By recording their travel it is easier for students to identify the need for positive change. In groups, students discuss and compare the results. Record the totals on a class chart.

Brainstorm

Brainstorm a list of suggestions for reducing car trips. Discuss any of the suggestions that would be relevant to students' families and encourage children to take suggestions home for discussion with their parents or care givers. Did they actually use any of the suggestions? Students could report back to the class during their morning talk time each day.

Links Section 5 - Resources - 5.1 Thinking and teaching strategies

Activities MIDDLE PRIMARY - 2.3 Learning activities

Pencil Activity 2.3 MP - Diary time (2 pages)

Introduce the sample diary page and show how it has been completed. Students can record the travel they completed yesterday on the practice diary page.

Class discussion

Ask students to think about what transport modes they have used in the last week. They will need to remember when they have been a passenger, used public transport, cycled, walked or even ridden their skateboard or scooter. Focus questions:

For example, saves money, less congestion on the roads, better for our health, encourages interaction with other community members, creates less greenhouse gas emissions.

Links Section 5 - Resources - 5.3 Text types

Pencil Activity 2.3 MP - Cars, cars and more cars (2 pages)

Complete the Activity.

Discuss with students the meaning of car ownership in Australia. Analyse the table of car ownership statistics. Create a graph using the statistics provided. Discuss:

Pencil Activity 2.3 MP - Our travel habits (2 pages)

Students are asked to think about and record the amount of time they spend in the car per week and the approximate number of trips they make using a variety of transport modes. Ask students to compare their lists in small groups, noting similarities and differences.

Pencil Activity 2.3 MP - Travel options

Students are given a number of travel options that could help to reduce their family car trips and are asked to make a decision as to whether or not they think these are options for their family. After completing this activity ask students to rate the options from most to least likely and explain why.

Activities UPPER PRIMARY - 2.3 Learning activities

Research

Vehicle ownership in Australia is recorded by the Australian Bureau of Statistics. Students can search for Australian car registrations by accessing the Bureau of Statistics web page and following the search path.

WWW Australian Bureau of Statistics

Build a table of motor vehicle registrations in Australia. What is the research telling you?

Focus questions:

Research

What is the vehicle ownership in other countries compared to Australia? To understand the statistics, students will need to:

WWW For example: European Union

Debate/exposition

Organise a class debate on the topic: 'That Australians own too many cars.'

Links Section 5 - Resources - 5.1 Thinking and teaching strategies

Survey

Students organise a survey to ascertain transport modes of students in their class and in other sections of the school. Collate the data and show results as a graph.

Class discussion

After completing the survey, discuss the following focus questions:

For students who used the bike or walking as popular travel options, how did they plan for these activities?

Students should be encouraged to understand that having travel options allows us to make decisions about what suits us best. Thinking about our travel habits and planning in advance means that we can make practical decisions that are beneficial to the environment, our health and the community.

Write a travel procedure

Students write a travel plan for a week. They will need to outline the mode of transport and number of passengers and concentrate on using efficient travel techniques such as trip chaining (see glossary) and other transport modes they have found in the Glossary. Add all transport modes to their own TravelSmart Log.

Compare their plans with a small group. Write a persuasive letter to their family outlining their plan for the week's travel.

Links Section 5 - Resources - 5.3 Text types
Section 5 - Resources - 5.4 Glossary



Travel diary

Through class discussion develop the concept of needing a reason to collect information.

Introduce and discuss with students the concept of a travel diary. Why is it a good idea? What is its purpose? Students design their own travel diary page. What information is needed? What facts have an impact on travel?

ICT ICT idea

Students design pages in table format, print and compile their own travel diary.


Pencil Activities 2.3 JP

Pencil Activities 2.3 MP


2.4 How we come to school

Objectives

To investigate and record different ways in which children travel to school and to investigate alternatives to their current travel habits.

Outcomes

Students will be able to:

Activities JUNIOR PRIMARY - 2.4 Learning activities

Pencil Activity 2.4 JP - Survey - How we come to school

This activity could be done as a whole class exercise. Using the table provided, students each record how they travelled to school. The activity also asks students to think about what factors influence transport modes choice.

Class discussion

Discuss with students the results of the data they have collected. Focus questions:

Display

Design a class display of the data results. Include a graph of the survey, information on factors influencing travel, information regarding local travel options and ideas for creating possibilities for using alternative transport modes. Ask students to write a letter to their families inviting them to come and view the display.

ICT ICT idea

Enter data results into a spreadsheet and graph the results.

Pencil Activity 2.4 JP - Key to street map features

Design and photocopy a simple map of the local area, which includes most streets that children use to travel to school. Name some streets, mark in traffic lights, crossings, special road features. Use Activity 2.4 JP - Key to street map features, to mark other places on the map. Ask students to find and mark some familiar places. Introduce the concept of a 'bird's eye view' and 'as the crow flies'.

Mapping

Ask students to mark the best walking route from home to school, or to plan a car journey that will reduce the distance travelled. In 'locality' groups, students compare their journeys. Do any of the planned travel routes look similar? If so, would it be possible to walk together? For students who have planned a car journey, discuss how they could make this more efficient.

'walking school bus'

Some schools have organised a program that enables students to walk to school with others in the care of responsible adults.

Find out if your school has a similar program. Encourage students to research how a 'walking school bus' works.

Activities MIDDLE PRIMARY - 2.4 Learning activities

Class discussion

Discuss the reasons why different families make different travel choices.

Focus questions:

Pencil Activity 2.4 MP - Survey - how we come to school

Students complete a survey to collect information from a target group in the school about modes of travel to school and the reasons why certain modes of travel are used. Create a graph to show the results. Discuss how to extend this research by making predictions, determining how to gather evidence to support or prove their predictions, and presenting a report of findings.

If students participated in a similar survey when they were in a Junior Primary class, it would be interesting to compare results and discuss reasons for changes that may have occurred.

Questionnaire

Design a 'tick box' questionnaire asking car travellers why they travel that way.

Add some more options to this example.

I travel by car because

Choose a target group (or groups) to complete your questionnaire. A representative group can be up to 10 people, or you could choose to ask people in different groups, for example, teachers, friends, students in Upper Primary or Junior Primary classes, people who are members of a community group that you belong to.

Using the information collected during your questionnaire, write and deliver a short talk outlining your findings.

Design

Design a poster or pamphlet which outlines a reward system for students who travel to school by alternative modes.

Design a storyboard for a print or TV advertisement, depicting factors that affect travel choice, the changes that can be made and their benefits.

Research

Find a song or poem that discusses the issue of travel choice and the effects on the environment and on our health. Students could select the best TravelSmart song and perform it as a class group.

Activities UPPER PRIMARY - 2.4 Learning activities

Street Directories and Public Transport Timetables

Using photocopies from the local street directory, ask students to plan travel to a destination in their town or city. Access the relevant bus and train timetables, either in hard copy or on the Internet, and research which service to travel on, where the closest bus stop or train station is, when they should be there, how long it will take to travel to their destination. Remind them to plan their return travel as well. If the travel has to include use of the motor car, remember to plan where it will be parked.

Plan travel across suburbs to:

Survey

Who has never travelled by bus? In conjunction with the classroom program, students plan an excursion which includes bus travel using the local bus service. Discuss the types of tickets available, how much they cost, the 'rules' of bus travel; for example, consideration for disabled and elderly people, reasonable behaviour, all body parts inside the bus at all times, how to indicate your destination stop.

Mapping

Map reading requires the understanding of several symbols. They are contained within a key/legend. Map reading also requires an understanding of scale.

Students create a map of the area surrounding the school, including at least ten streets. Add all the features and symbols that they would find on a commercially produced street map. Students create their own town, including all the features that they think are important. Try to make the town environmentally sustainable by providing less roads and more travel alternatives; for example, bicycle tracks, walking tracks, parks and gardens.

Pencil Activities 2.4 JP

Pencil Activity 2.4 MP


2.5 Parking it

Objectives

To understand that cars take up a lot of space - when travelling and when parked.

Outcomes

Students will be able to:

Activities JUNIOR PRIMARY - 2.5 Learning activities

Garages

If you've got a car you need a place to park it. Garages or car parking spaces take up a lot of area on a house block. Ask students to measure the size of the garage or car park space at their home. Ask them to think about how they could make the area more attractive. Could they plant trees around it or have hanging baskets along one of the sides? What could they do with the space if the car didn't need it?

Discussion

What would be good and what would be bad if we were not allowed to have car space at our homes?

Design

Lots of garages are used for more than just parking the car. They can also be a workshop, a storage area with cupboards and shelving, a place to keep gardening implements. Some people even have a comfortable chair in the garage for a quiet place to sit. Ask students to plan the sort of garage they would like to have at their home - think about the space needed for the car, the extra space needed for their ideas and how they would make the building look attractive.

Activities MIDDLE PRIMARY - 2.5 Learning activities

Class discussion

Discuss with students their experiences in regard to parking. Have they ever been a passenger in a car with a driver who has become annoyed or angry at not being able to find a car park? Why aren't there enough places for everybody to park their cars?

Focus questions:

Pencil Activity 2.5 MP - Parking it

Following directions in the Activity, students measure the parking dimensions of a car, including a passenger exit allowance and the distance between parked cars. In order to determine how much space the average car takes up, students are asked to measure a variety of cars and calculate an average.

Research

How big is a bus? Students calculate the space taken to park a bus. Would we need as many parking spaces? How would the 'passenger - vehicle' ratio compare?

Consider these questions, using knowledge gained to measure the area a car occupies while parked. Calculate the area for a bus. Write a brief report examining the difference in average parking area required between buses and cars and if this is an advantage or a disadvantage in terms of reducing car parking spaces.

Links Section 5 - Resources - 5.3 Text types

Car parks

Many of the world's cities have huge multi storey car parks so that people can drive to work, park their car all day and then drive home again. It's like having two garages for each car. On a class excursion to the city, inspect a multi storey car park. Make an appointment to ask the manager of the car park some questions.

Focus questions:

Calculate how much money is generated by the car park in a day / week / month / year. Have a good look at the car park. Is it attractive? Compare it with surrounding buildings. What do you think of the car park as part of the cityscape?

Class discussion

Many people drive to work because they think it is the only way to get there. Brainstorm other ways in which people can travel to work. List the advantages and disadvantages of each mode of transport, considering the time it takes, the cost, safety and shelter, convenience, implications for people with disabilities, ease of carrying a bag full of books or a laptop.

Big Yellow Taxi

Access the lyrics of 'Big Yellow Taxi' on the Internet. What is the message? Prepare an item for an assembly - perform the song - karaoke style - and explain what it means.

WWW www.lyricsdomain.com/lyrics/22267/

Activities UPPER PRIMARY - 2.5 Learning activities

Concept map

There are cities around the world where car transport is not allowed in the Central Business District (CBD). Only public transport vehicles are permitted in the city centre. With the class, develop a concept map of the implications of a 'car free' CBD environment.

Links Section 5 - Resources - 5.1 Thinking and teaching strategies

Design

Using the ideas from Class discussion, students develop a design for a 'car free' city centre. Make a list of specifications, including types of public transport and their requirements, number of people who move in and out of the city for work each day, ways to access accommodation and recreation, entertainment and education venues.

Design a vehicle that uses minimum space for parking, for example, a 'bubble car'. Suggest ways in which your vehicle could be parked and estimate how many could be parked in conventional car parking spaces.

Pencil Activity 2.5 MP


2.6 The spread of cities

Objectives

To examine the layout of cities and how this relates to travel options and to reinforce the idea that transport choices are based on need, distance and convenience.

Outcomes

Students will be able to:

Learning activities for Middle and Upper Primary only

Activities MIDDLE PRIMARY - 2.6 Learning activities

Brainstorm

How often have you visited the centre of a city - the Central Business District? What are the things you saw that made it different to other parts of the city or the town where you live? Sort your brainstorm into 'good' and 'not good' sections. Would you like to live in the middle of the city? Think about the 'good' and 'not good' aspects of inner city life.

Links Section 5 - Resources - 5.1 Thinking and teaching strategies

Excursion

Plan an excursion to a city centre. Record types of transport, homes, business buildings, car parks that you see.

ICT ICT idea

Use a digital camera to record good and bad examples of buildings, transport, safety issues in the CBD. Display photographs with comments.

Class discussion

Look at a map of your suburb or town. Where do the main roads go to? Are there several shopping centres or only one? Are all the community facilities in one place or are they scattered throughout the area? What effect does this have on transport choices and how you get to places in your community?

Activities UPPER PRIMARY - 2.6 Learning activities

Pencil Activity 2.6 UP - The spread of cities

Decode the three city maps using the key. What sort of transport options would be appropriate for each city?

Discuss the concept that the car has been one of the reasons for city expansion because everything is accessible by car. As a result, travel and commercial needs have emerged as a priority and are constantly being addressed as car ownership increases.

Access maps of cities around the world and describe the city shapes. What are the advantages of each type of city? What are the disadvantages? Create a display of cities with summaries of the findings you have made.

WWW For example

www.google.com > Images > map Sydney

Class discussion

Discuss with students:

Focus questions:

Design

Think about what you have learnt about city design. Using this knowledge, design a city that would encourage its inhabitants to use alternative modes of travel. Brainstorm with a friend what sorts of things you would need to include. Add a legend or key that explains the different parts of your city design.

Pencil Activity 2.6 UP