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TRAVELSMART TEACHER RESOURCE KIT, 2003

Section 5 - Resources

5.1 Thinking and teaching strategies
5.2 The development of the motor car and bicycle
5.3 Text types
5.4 Inclusion of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs)
5.5 Glossary
5.6 Additional resources

5.1 Thinking and teaching strategies

Brainstorm

A brainstorm activity can be conducted by an individual, a small group or a whole class. It is a list of all the thoughts, ideas and concepts and is the first recording of knowledge about a topic.

No suggestions are wrong - they are all recorded, without discussion, on whiteboard, butcher's paper or using a graphic organiser program. Leaving a brainstorm on display for a few days allows students to add their ideas when they think of them.

A second stage to a brainstorm is the identification of subheadings and sorting the ideas accordingly.

Motoe Car Diagram

Concept map

A concept mapping activity can further develop one of the headings relating to the topic.

It explores related concepts and is planned under relevant question starters - how, when, where, why, who, what.

Fuel Diagram

Mind map

Mind mapping represents the links between concepts and establishes common grounds. A mind map is an excellent way of planning a report, persuasive argument, discussion or debate. It allows for relevant details and references to be added and is, potentially, a rough draft.

Public Transport

Plus. Minus. Interesting

The PMI activity is a visual representation that organises thinking into positive and negative aspects and the implications of both on an idea. It is best organised in columns and can be used in developing an argument or debate or making decisions.

More information about thinking tools can be located at:

WWW

Question matrix

The question matrix encourages application of the question starters - how, when, where, why, who and what - in a variety of contexts. Use of this strategy encourages higher level thinking as students realise the potential of asking specific questions.

The question matrix can be accessed at

WWW

Links Debate

Debates take a bit of organisation but are a lot of fun. Students learn to respect the rights of others to have different, valid points of view. In planning a debate, start small - with directed discussion and development of one aspect of each side of a topic.

A standard debate process is:

Students form 2 teams of 3 speakers. One team is the affirmative and the other, the negative.

The teams are each given the topic and allowed a certain time to plan their arguments. A leader of each team is chosen.

In the debate, speaking order is

Then it is usual to take a short break, for the leaders to plan their final speeches.

The leader of the negative concludes their argument and rebuttal (1 minute) followed by the leader of the affirmative team (1 minute).

Following a debate, students can discuss points raised. In formal debates, an adjudicator judges the whole debate and announces the winning team.

Links Thinkers keys

WWW www.lea.co.nz/citest/ciinpractice/tools/thinkerskeys.htm

This resource explores many directions of divergent thinking.

Interviewing

Interviewing people is an excellent way of obtaining first hand information about a subject by asking relevant questions of a person who has experience and knowledge of the subject being studied.

The key to successful interviewing is to be VERY WELL PREPARED

You WILL NEED:

STEP 1 - Groundwork

STEP 2 - Preliminary contact

STEP 3 - Preparation

AT THIS STAGE IT IS VERY IMPORTANT THAT YOU PRACTISE INTERVIEWING - ASK YOUR PARENTS / TEACHERS / FRIENDS TO HELP. ALSO PRACTISE SCRIBING AND CASSETTE OR VIDEO RECORDING.

STEP 4 - The Interview

Be

When the interview has finished, ask the interviewee if it would be all right if you contacted them again - for further explanations, clarification or maybe more questions.

If the interviewee has books / photos / papers for you to use or borrow, you must be honest with yourself. If you aren't very good at keeping track of your own possessions - DON'T BORROW FROM ANYONE ELSE.

If you do use the materials offered, make sure you return them as soon as possible - and always within a week.

STEP 5 - Finalisation

REMEMBER to add the details of your interview to your bibliography. It is a great idea to acknowledge an interview as a source of information.

BIBLIOGRAPHIC FORM for example:

Name of interviewee Date Title of interview Place
Sherie Smith 1 July 2003 How did you travel to school today? Name of school